Quotable Quotes, So Relevant in 2019

Quotable Quotes, So Relevant in 2019

You read a book, and a part of it sticks with you. Sometimes even for ever. Some of these quotes are so beautiful, you want to get them printed on tees and on mugs. And some become the wallpapers that adorn your phone or your laptop. Here are ten of my absolute favorites, starting with a quote from a book I happened to read only yesterday.

• You can’t sit on the fence for ever.

My Sister The Serial Killer, Oyinkan Braithwaite

• Eleanor was right. She never looked nice. She looked like art, and art wasn’t supposed to look nice; it was supposed to make you feel something.

Eleanor and Park, Rainbow Rowell

Anybody can look at you. It’s quite rare to find someone who sees the same world you see.

Turtles All The Way Down, John Green

• It’s one thing to fall in love. It’s another to feel someone else fall in love with you, and to feel a responsibility toward that love.

Every Day, David Levithan

I’m constantly left to wonder if the people we are online will lever materialize in real life.

Puddin’, Julie Murphy

There’s something disturbing about recalling a warm memory and feeling utterly cold.

Gone Girl, Gillian Flynn

In my opinion, most marriages are based either on money or on the fear of being alone.

The Other Woman, Daniel Silva

• Men who want to get married
propose. You don’t need to read the signs. They propose and that’s the sign.

Wedding Night, Sophie Kinsella

Rich folks can tolerate almost anything, but not rejection.

The King of Torts, John Grisham

What happens when people open their hearts? They get better.

Norwegian Wood, Haruki Murakami

What are some of your favorite book quotes?

Book Review: Harry Potter and The Cursed Child

Book Review: Harry Potter and The Cursed Child

When Ms Rowling doesn’t write a Harry Potter book, and lets other people do it – well, it’s a disaster waiting to happen . Oh Potter, you rotter…

First off, writing Harry Potter in PLAY FORM? That’s just wrong. On so many levels. 

The book (shall we call it that or just, more appropriately, call it trash) starts where the seventh book left off basically. King’s Cross. Harry’s youngest boy, Albus Severus gets put in Slytherin, becomes best friends with DRACO MALFOY’S son, Scorpius – who has a crush on Rose Granger-Weasley. Does any of that surprise you? 

Oh, and Hermione is Minister for Magic. That’s my favorite bit. 

Who’s the cursed child, you ask? I’d assumed it would be Albus. Or Scorpius, even. But no. It’s this whole new character called Delphi ‘Diggory’. Remember that part in Deathly Hallows when Rowling says this about Bellatrix: 

…mere words could not demonstrate her longing for closeness.

Well apparently, Bella darling did get some that night. Some post dinner Voldy/Bella action totally happened and then… Delphi. You do realize I’m shaking my head at this point, don’t you? Harry Potter isn’t a children’s book anymore if it’s talking about adultery. Bella may have found the Dark Lord broody and hot as hell, but did she really have to cheat on poor old Rudolphus? At least this guy had a nose. I mean, come on, Bella. 

Gross. 

Also, the book has quite a few typos. 

I also don’t like the fact that Time-Turners were used to alter the whole story line. The whole lot was smashed in Order of the Phoenix and should have stayed that way. You don’t fix anything Harry Potter. You just don’t. 

In other words, I positively loathe this book. Thank Goodness the book is really pretty looking. Black and gold leather(ish), hardcover. I’m nearly done with John’s reading challenge – The Cursed Child fulfils the “book published in 2016” category.

This piece of – I’m truly, utterly, sorry – crap deserves a zero rating. 

Rant over. 

Book Review: Carry On

Book Review: Carry On

Rainbow Rowell is probably my favorite YA author. I’ve read Eleanor and Park 300 times. The only book of hers that I didn’t particularly like was Landline. I read Carry On earlier this year, and I re-read it yesterday, and well, it’s a good book. 

It talks about a powerful wizard (magician?) called Simon Snow and his relationship with Baz, his roommate. And also, it uncovers many mysteries. Set in 2015, it talks about the world of Mages, where laptops work. And cell phones. Compared to Harry Potter, this is new. No Muggle gadget would work within Hogwarts. But at Watford, where Simon goes to school, Normal (non magic people) gadgets do work. 

Rowell took a lot of inspiration from Harry Potter, obviously. But she put her own twist to it. 

This is also a love story, of Baz the vampire and Simon the chosen one. Does this remind you of the obvious love story gone sour between Dumbledore and Grindelwald? That JK Rowling never mentioned in the books, but told us later? Yes. 

Rowell’s Penelope is obviously a version of Rowling’s Hermione. The brains. The finely honed spell work. It’s brilliant and unsettling because the spells in Carry on are like regular everyday phrases like “Clean as a whistle”. What?! A tad bit unsettling. 

The romance is the nicest part. Kissing moles like they were a target? Oooooooh. 

Have you read this book? Thoughts?